Quick Answer: Are You Going To Or Will You?

Is it May you or will you?

In this case, may is wrong because she is not asking or giving permission: she is making a request.

So: may and can are used interchangeably when asking or giving permission.

would (or will) and can (or could) are used interchangeably when making a request..

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Is how may I help you correct grammar?

The most polite expression is “How may I help you?” (“may,” not “many”). You will also hear people say “How can I help you?” To the punctilious, “may” is preferable to “can,” but both expressions are gracious and acceptable, much better than “Whassup?” (If I say, “How may I help?” I’m asking permission to help.

Can or will you?

Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Can I come or should I come?

Both are correct. The meaning is different. “What time can I come?” is asking permission in a friendly way. “What time should I come?” = “What time must I come?”

Can and could grammar?

We sometimes use be able to instead of “can” or “could” for ability. Be able to is possible in all tenses – but “can” is possible only in the present and “could” is possible only in the past for ability. In addition, “can” and “could” have no infinitive form.

Which one is correct I shall or I will?

As a general rule, use ‘will’ for affirmative and negative sentences about the future. Use ‘will’ for requests too. If you want to make an offer or suggestion with I/we, use ‘shall’ in the question form. For very formal statements, especially to describe obligations, use ‘shall’.

When to use going to or will?

When you are plans are definite, use GOING TO. When you dream of doing something, use WILL. When you’re talking about actions that are far into the future (months or maybe years from now), use WILL. When you’re talking about actions that you will do soon (tomorrow or next week), use GOING TO.

How do you use going to in a sentence?

Example SentencesI am going to study more tonight.I’m going to play video games after dinner.I am not going to go to class today.I’m not going to watch the show tonight.You are going to like this movie.You’re going to be angry.You are not going to finish on time if you keep working slow.More items…

Is it to or too early?

“Too early” is correct. “Too” means “more than you would want” so this sentence translates to “More early than you would want.” This sentence is grammatically correct and preserves your meaning.

How do you politely ask?

Here are some tips on asking for favors:Be direct but polite. … Don’t make it sound bad. … Avoid guilt. … Don’t cross the line. … Show respect. … Avoid constant one-sided favors. … Be personal but straightforward. … Take “No” for an answer.More items…•

Is it you have to or you have too?

Too. To is a preposition with several meanings, including “toward” and “until.” Too is an adverb that can mean “excessively” or “also.”

How do we use going to for future?

Use of going to Futurean action in the near future that has already been planned or prepared. example: I am going to study harder next year.a conclusion regarding the immediate future. example: The sky is absolutely dark. It is going to rain.

Do you say me to or me too?

All are correct but depends on the contents. “Me too” for instance is referring to be as how the other person is in terms of their state, and “me to” refers to transferring a gift to another person. With this, you would say “this gift is from me to you”.

Can I speak to or may I speak to?

“May I speak to …” asks for permission. “Can I speak to …” says you’re not asking for permission, you want so speak to … if it’s at all possible. You have a better chance of getting through to … if you use “can.” No, actually there’s no difference, except that “may” marks you as a stickler for formal grammar.

How do I get permission to talk?

Asking for permissioncould is more formal and polite than can:may is another more formal and polite way of asking for permission:may is a more formal and polite way of giving permission:may is a more formal and polite way of saying that someone has permission:

Can I ask you something answer?

What’s the most polite way to answer “can I ask you a question?” If you’re willing to hear them out, then “Yes, you may” is polite, formal and grammatically correct. You are not obligated to answer their question if you don’t want to. You said you’d listen, not that you’d reveal private information.

Can I ask you something if you don’t mind?

You’re asking the listener if he/she doesn’t mind your “asking.” It’s almost as if saying that the person asking the question isn’t the one actually asking it, but the verb itself is the thing asking. “If you don’t mind me asking” This is a more usual way of saying it.

Will grammar rules?

We normally use WILL to speak about the future. It is always combined with another verb. Since WILL is classified as a modal verb (like can, would, could, should) it has the same characteristics: It does not change in the third person (i.e. he, she, it)

What do we use should for?

“Should” is a modal verb most commonly used to make recommendations or give advice. It can also be used to express obligation as well as expectation.

Has to and have to sentences?

have to, has to in the Simple PresentPronounsAffirmative sentencesNegative sentencesI, we, you, theyI have to get up early.I do not have to get up early.he, she, itShe has to get up early.She does not have to get up early.

What is the formula of going to?

Using the “going to” construction, the formula is [am/is/are] + not + going to + [root form]. Jen is not going to quit before she reaches her goal. Make sure you arrive on time tomorrow because the bus is not going to wait for you.

Is it love you too or to?

” I love you, too.” should be the correct way of saying, of writing; this “too”, means “also”, “in the same manner or way”, “likewise”. It’s more colloquial, more popularly used than to say “I also love you”.

Is Can I go to the bathroom grammatically correct?

So while yes, asking “may I go to the bathroom?” is asking for permission, asking the “can” question is actually referring to “are the conditions of me being able to the bathroom met?” which includes but is not exclusive just having permission. …

Will and going to examples?

Will + infinitiveBe going to + infinitiveA prediction based on opinion: I think the Conservatives will win the next election.A prediction based on something we can see (or hear) now: The Conservatives are going to win the election. They already have most of the votes.A future fact: The sun will rise tomorrow.2 more rows